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Thursday, September 06, 2007

Uthappa Saves The Day...

The best one-day matches are decided in tight finishes and, when the life of a series hangs in that balance, it makes the tension that much more real. Led by a magnificent 94 from Sachin Tendulkar and an icy-cool unbeaten 47 from Robin Uthappa, India hunted down the target of 316 with two balls to spare. England fought hard and never let go but the price India paid for playing only four bowlers was compensated - if only just - by the decision to play seven batsmen.

The last few overs were dramatic, and none more than the final one. Uthappa, playing in his first match of the series and batting in the unfamiliar role of the finisher, found himself facing Stuart Broad, England's best bowler of the day, with ten runs needed to keep his team in the series. The first ball yielded a hard-run two but Broad fired the next in the blockhole; Uthappa could only dig it out to straight to the bowler, who comfortably ran out Zaheer Khan, who had backed up too far.

The next ball was another full ball, aimed at the middle stump. Uthappa, though, was outside the off-stump by the time the ball got to him and deftly helped it over the short fine-leg. The fielder was pushed back and in came long off. This time Uthappa was down the wicket and the ball went screaming past mid off. Through these two high-quality and calculated strokes, one young man had out-thought the other. It was a nerveless innings when the run chase had threatened to go horribly wrong.

India began their pursuit with their heaviest artillery, Tendulkar and Sourav Ganguly, firing in unison. Ganguly set thetone,putting James Anderson away through his favourite point region. Tendulkar Sachin at His BEST!! then responded with a flick off Stuart Broad that flew off the bat and it was game on. There was decisiveness to the calling as the pair pinched quick singles. While they still traded largely in boundaries, there was no hesitancy in the running between wickets, a refreshing trend after the last few games.

Tendulkar picked off Anderson for three consecutive boundaries - an off-drive, a flick through square-leg and a repeat of the earlier stroke - in the 8th over, and Ganguly was keen not to be left out. Off the next over he came breezily down the pitch to Stuart Broad and carved him over cover. There was an exchange of words as Broad clearly wasn't enjoying bowling to two highly skilled one-day batsmen on an unhelpful pitch. All this did was spur Ganguly on further, and another trip down the pitch sent the ball several rows back in the stands behind long-on.

The Indian fifty - hardly maniacal - came off 49 balls, and soon enough Tendulkar brought up his 83rd half-century. The next Indian fifty came even sooner, off 37 balls, and suddenly the target of 316 appeared manageable.

With Tendulkar sweeping past short fine-leg when the man was in the circle, and hitting inside-out through cover when the field changed, there was little the bowlers could do. Needing to score at more than six-an-over for the 50-over span, it needed runs from both ends, and Ganguly matched Tendulkar in volume and entertainment. He even unfurled the pull, timing and placing the ball perfectly, one bounce and over the ropes.

What made India's progress particularly pleasing was the fact that barely a serious appeal had passed in the course of the partnership. Then, against the run of play Ganguly fell, on 53, when he made room and tried to hit over the off side. He just failed to clear Kevin Pietersen at cover and India lost their first wicket on exactly 150. Broad, who had bowled with purpose amid the run-glut, finally had reward for his toil.

 Then came a passage of play that Indian fans are familiar with. One wicket was followed by another as Tendulkar, cramping and struggling on, hit Monty Panesar inside-out, much like Ganguly, and was caught by Collingwood. Tendulkar had fallen in the nineties for the fourth time on this tour, and soon after the complexion of the game changed.

Dravid fell to a soft dismissal; Yuvraj Singh hit a couple of pleasing shots but checked a drive and popped a catch back to Dimitri Mascarenhas; Gautam Gambhir threatened to consolidate but threw his wicket away at 47. When he fell, India had 234 on the board and still needed 83 from 58 balls. Then Mahendra Singh Dhoni and Uthappa shepherded India through a passage where the required rate rocketed over 10.

The two kept their cool, and despite some  intelligent bowling from Broad, the runs came. Uthappa scooped one over short fine-leg, pulled off the front foot, and a couple of edges either side of the wicketkeeper put India within touching distance of the target. Still, with 23 needed from the last two overs, and the bowlers sacrificing their wickets, it came right down to the wire with 10 needed from the last over. Then Uthappa, with 47 from only 33 balls, went from being a passenger to a hero.

Source

REY!

Wednesday, September 05, 2007

Do Not Disturb, finally a Reality...

Yes!! over 230 Million Indian Telecom subscribers will be able to seek relief from unwanted telemarketing calls, as the Nation's first of its kind, Do Not Disturb initiative comes into action Today!

India's telecom regulator Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) in June unveiled the "Telecom Unsolicited Commercial Communications Regulations 2007", putting in place a mechanism to curb unwanted telemarketing calls.

This will allow both cellphone and landline owners to register their numbers under the National Do Not Call (NDNC) database and will free them of recieveing Unsolicited Commercial Communications (UCC), including SMSes...

The Indian government's Department of Telecommunications had authorized the National Informatics Center (NIC) to oversee the installation, operation and maintenance of the NDNC registry.

Under the new regulation, telemarketers have to verify their list of telelphone numbers, which they will be using to call for telemarketing, with the NDNC registry before making a call. According to the directive, every telemarketer have to register themselves with the NDNC database to make sure that the list of numbers they have, does not include those numbers, which are present in the registry. An updated list will also be sent to the telemarketers every 15 days.

Subscribers can register their numbers free of charge, via SMS, phone, online or letter. Service providers have ten days to acknowledge such requests, which will be made effective within 45 days from the date of request.

Errant telemarketers will pay a fine of US$12.20 (500 rupee) per call to the subscriber as penalty, a bid to deter marketers from marking calls numbers registered in NDNC list. Recalcitrant telemarketers can also face disconnection of their telecom service. (Now that made some sense..... :-p)

REY! 

Sunday, September 02, 2007

5710 Xpress Music or 5700 Xpress Music Black Edition???

Oh man, this thing is making me crazy. 29th August, the day N95 8GB, N81, 5610 and 5310 were announced, in the early hours the photos of 5700 Black Edition swarmed the Internet, some said its 5710, the upgrade to the 5700 and some said its the same 5700 with just the Pure Black theme...

Now the point is that after hours of the news of release of 5700 Black or so called 5710 ,the photos and the news about it was removed... (??) And now there is no official information about that phone which swarmed the Internet and disappeared like a ghost. It brought a hope to have 5700 in Pure Black theme(Black is Beautiful), but now it seems we have to live with the girly Red and not so cool Grey...

Some Pics...




 
I just loved the design and the Black Look.... I hope its not a rumour and it exists actually........ 


REY!

  

07:56 Posted in Technology | Permalink | Comments (2) | Tags: Nokia, N95, 8GB, N81, 5310, 5610, 5700